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Easter Seals British Columbia/Yukon

3981 Oak Street
Vancouver, BC V6H 4H5
President & CEO: Charlene Krepiakevich
Board Chair: Tracy Lakeman

Website: www.lionsbc.ca
Charitable Reg. #: 11921 7248 RR0001
Sector: Social Services
Operating Charity

Donor Accountability

Grade: C

The grade is based on the charity's public reporting of the work it does and the results it achieves.

Financial Transparency

Audited financial statements for current and previous years available on the charity's website [ Audited financial statement for most recent year ]

Need for Funding

Funding Reserves Program Costs

Spending Breakdown

Cents to The Cause

95¢
75¢
avg
65¢
50¢
2015 2016 2017
For a dollar donated, cents funding the cause after fundraising and admin costs, excluding surplus.

Full-time staff #21

Avg. Compensation $69,808

Top 10 Staff Salary Range

$350k + 0
$300k - $350k 0
$250k - $300k 0
$200k - $250k 0
$160k - $200k 1
$120k - $160k 0
$80k - $120k 3
$40k - $80k 6
< $40k 0
Information from most recent CRA Charities Directorate filings for F2017

About Easter Seals British Columbia/Yukon:

Founded in 1947, Easter Seals British Columbia and Yukon is a service of the British Columbia Lions Society for Children with Disabilities. Its mission is to inspire communities across BC and Yukon to support and enable access for individuals with disabilities. The charity reports that in British Columbia and Yukon, approximately 736,000 adults and 26,000 children and youth have a disability that limits their independence and quality of life. Easter Seals BC and Yukon provides specialized services and facilities for children with disabilities. The charity’s head office is in Vancouver.

The charity’s main program is Easter Seals Camps (68% of program costs in F2017) which are outdoor, overnight camps for children and young adults with physical and/or mental disabilities. It owns three camps: Camp Shawnigan on Vancouver Island, Camp Squamish north of Vancouver, and Camp Winfield in the Okanagan Valley, but only operated Camp Winfield in 2018. Five camp sessions were held in 2018, each 6 days and 5 nights in length. The charity reports that 200-300 children attend Camp Winfield each year. Camp activities include arts and crafts, rock climbing, swimming, canoeing, talent shows, camping out and wheelchair sports.

Easter Seals BC/Yukon operates the Easter Seals House (32% of program costs) which offers out-of-town families affordable accommodations while their children receive medical treatment in Vancouver. Easter Seals House has 49 rooms and provides over 30,000 bed nights a year. Each suite includes a private bathroom and kitchenette, and is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

BC Lions Society also has several Community Support programs (less than 0.1% of program costs) including Easter Seals Buses, patient care grants and educational awards for children with disabilities.

Financial Review:

Easter Seals British Columbia/Yukon is a medium-sized charity with donations and special events revenues of $1.6m in F2017, a 55% decrease compared to F2015. Despite its significant decline in donations, the charity has increased its spending on programs since F2015. Easter Seals BC and Yukon received $1.7m in fees for service related to its camp programs and Easter Seals House. In F2016 and F2014, it received $1.0m in government funding.

Administrative costs are 18% of revenues and fundraising costs are 66% of donations. The charity has decreased its administrative and fundraising costs since F2015 in response to decreased donations. Per dollar donated to the charity, $0.16 goes to its programs, falling well outside Ci’s reasonable range for overhead spending. Easter Seals BC and Yukon’s interest-bearing debt of $3.1m exceeds its liquid assets of $1.7m, of which $420k is donor-endowed. The charity’s negative funding reserves of $1.4m indicate a need for donations.

This charity report is an update that has been sent to British Columbia Lions Society for Children with Disabilities for review. Changes and edits may be forthcoming.

Updated on August 20, 2018 by Derek Houlberg.

Financial Ratios

Fiscal year ending September
201720162015
Administrative costs as % of revenues 18.1%11.3%14.4%
Fundraising costs as % of donations 66.1%55.3%51.7%
Program cost coverage (%) (45.3%)(3.1%)(41.8%)

Summary Financial Statements

All figures in $000s
201720162015
Donations 8141,6082,130
Goods in kind 345693662
Government funding 01,0000
Fees for service 1,7501,9431,835
Lotteries (net) 413455
Special events 7401,1661,288
Investment income 6811713
Total revenues 3,7586,5615,984
Program costs 3,1033,0252,763
Administrative costs 668727862
Fundraising costs 1,0271,5331,766
Other costs 107107117
Cash flow from operations (1,147)1,169476
Funding reserves (1,405)(93)(1,155)
Note: Ci has removed amortization of deferred capital contributions, decreasing total revenues by $194k in F2017, $168k in F2016 and $174k in F2015. Ci reports lottery revenue net of expenses, decreasing total revenues and expenses by $125k in F2017, $132k in F2016 and $124k in F2015.

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