Youth Without Shelter

6 Warrendale Court
Toronto, ON M9V 1P9
Executive Director: Steve Doherty
Board Chair: Moez Bawania

Website: www.yws.on.ca
Charitable Reg. #: 11930 7817 RR0001
Sector: Social Services - At-Risk Youth
Operating Charity

Charity Rating

[Charity Rating: 4/4]

Results Reporting

Grade: A

The grade is based on the charity's public reporting of the work it does and the results it achieves.

Financial Transparency

Audited financial statements for current and previous years available on the charity's website [Audited financial statement for most recent year]

Need for Funding

Funding Reserves Program Costs

Spending Breakdown

Cents to the Cause

95¢
75¢
avg
65¢
50¢
2016 2017 2018
For a dollar donated, cents funding the cause after fundraising and admin costs, excluding surplus.

Impact Rating: Good

Full-time staff #25

Avg. Compensation $56,279

Top 10 Staff Salary Range

$350k + 0
$300k - $350k 0
$250k - $300k 0
$200k - $250k 0
$160k - $200k 0
$120k - $160k 0
$80k - $120k 1
$40k - $80k 9
< $40k 0
Information from most recent CRA Charities Directorate filings for F2018

About Youth Without Shelter:

Youth Without Shelter (YWS) works with homeless youth aged 16 to 24, providing emergency shelter and programs to empower clients to live independently. It was founded in 1986 by a group of teachers and guidance counsellors frustrated with the lack of safe emergency housing and support programs for homeless students.

In F2018, Youth Without Shelter’s residential program received 46% of program spending. There are 33 emergency shelter beds available each night. The program provides shelter, counselling, regular meals, clothing and personal hygiene products to the youth. In F2018, YWS provided 59,305 meals/snacks and 4,929 one-on-one counselling sessions.

In F2018, 29% of program spending was allocated to Stay in School. YWS recognizes that homeless youth often leave school and that having limited education is a significant disadvantage in life. The program has 20 beds, providing a stable living environment, clothing, hygiene products, nutritious food, and counselling to enable youth to succeed. Students can also access tutoring, computers, and school supplies.

YWS allocated 8% of spending to housing and after-care programs in F2018. The charity works to place clients in stable housing to avoid them becoming homeless again. In F2018, 70 youth were moved into permanent housing and the charity hosted 1,104 after-care meetings to deliver continued support.

Of the remaining program spending in F2018, 5% was allocated to teaching clients life skills, 5% to coordinating volunteers, 3% to outreach, and 3% to finding employment for clients.

Youth Without Shelter has the goal of helping 500 youth exit homelessness into stable housing between 2019 and 2024.

Results and Impact:

Of participants in the Stay in School program, YWS reports that 47% improved their problem-solving skills, 52% increased listening, 55% improved communication, and 51% learned to better cope with issues. Eight students from the program graduated in F2018.

Through the employment programs, 54 clients were able to find jobs.

Charity Intelligence has analyzed Youth Without Shelter since 2009 and it has consistently been shown to have strong impact per dollar donated, with a demonstrated impact rating of Good (see grid below). 

Financial Review:

Youth Without Shelter is a medium-sized charity with donations of $1.5m in F2018, including $254k in donated goods. YWS received $1.2m in government funding, representing 44% of total revenues. Administrative costs are 5% of revenues and fundraising costs are 14% of donations. For every dollar donated, 81 cents go to the cause, which is within Ci’s reasonable range for overhead spending. YWS has $1.7m in funding reserves which could cover nine months of program costs.

This charity report is an update that has been sent to Youth Without Shelter for review. Changes and edits may be forthcoming.

Results reporting analysis completed on November 19, 2018 by Katie Khodawandi.

Profile updated on June 25, 2019 by Madison Kerr.

Financial Ratios

Fiscal year ending March
201820172016
Administrative costs as % of revenues 5.4%13.2%6.0%
Fundraising costs as % of donations 13.9%15.6%16.6%
Program cost coverage (%) 78.2%79.1%66.4%

Summary Financial Statements

All figures in $s
201820172016
Donations 1,268,6491,034,4441,107,161
Goods in kind 253,996344,072353,097
Government funding 1,200,1041,201,3341,166,139
Other income 9,69735,3407,367
Total revenues 2,732,4462,615,1902,633,764
Program costs 2,176,4631,937,6962,061,765
Administrative costs 146,763344,416158,254
Fundraising costs 176,809160,915183,720
Cash flow from operations 232,411172,163230,025
Funding reserves 1,701,4311,532,8261,368,473
Note: Ci has included property and equipment grant received and excluded amortization of deferred capital contributions, affecting revenues by ($33k) in F2018, ($65k) in F2017, and ($78k) in F2016. Administrative and fundraising costs are as reported on the charity’s T3010 filing with the CRA, removed from program costs and presented separately.

Comments added by the Charity:

The following comments have been previously added by the charity and may not reflect the 2019 profile: 

Two core practices guide all services at YWS:

1)   Strength-based model of care:  focuses on young people’s strengths and building a safe, community within our walls and a relationship based upon trust and respect.

2)   Trauma informed care:  “Everyone has the right to a future that is not dictated by their past.” Majority of the youth YWS serves have had to deal with overwhelming personal experiences that may have changed their perception about life.  Our goal is to have a support system that will empower young people to success, and help them transition from a post-traumatic state to post-traumatic growth.

In June 2015 after consultation with our stakeholders and the youth we serve the YWS Board of Directors committed to a strategic plan that will guide YWS over the next three years. Considering all that we heard and learned from our stakeholders and youth a strategic plan has been developed with four strategic priorities, that can be viewed on our website.

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